weandthecolor:

Graphic Prints of Iconic Football Moments

Check out all of the graphic football prints by Rick Hincks or discover other graphic design on WE AND THE COLOR.

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aiurare:

“This project began from the theory that humans are made of cosmic matter as a result of a stars death. I created imagery that showcased this cosmic birth through the use of dust and reflective confetti to create galaxies. The models organic bodily expressions as they are frozen in time between the particles suggest their celestial creation. In addition, space and time is heightened by the use of three-dimensional animated gifs. Their movement serves as a visual metaphor to the spatial link we share with stars as well as their separateness through time.” – Ignacio Torres

(Source: knowyourdarkness)

The Vinyl Factory is a music and arts enterprise curating exhibitions and producing limited edition vinyl packaging in collaboration with artists and designers. Combining a logotype with a series of experimental mark making techniques Village Green created a simple identity system that is used across a number of promotions and applications.

thedsgnblog:

Atto   |   http://atto.si

"Redesign of visual identity for Uovo Performing Arts Festival. Designed at Zetalab. Year: 2013."

Atto is a design consultancy based in Milan, directed by Sara Bianchi and Andrea Zambardi who decided to found an independent studio after gaining experience working several years with different studios (Studio Bianca, Alizarina, Zetalab). Atto works on a various range of projects: brand identity, editorial, illustration, motion graphic and web always taking care of every details and steps of the process. Atto believes in the value of teaching. We collaborate with schools in the education of young designers (Politecnico di Milano, Istituto Europeo di Design) and develop workshops for children to explain them the job of the graphic designer.

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I’d always looked enviously at the people who earned more than I did; now, for the first time, I was embarrassed for them, and for me. I made in a single year more than my mom made her whole life. I knew that wasn’t fair; that wasn’t right. Yes, I was sharp, good with numbers. I had marketable talents. But in the end I didn’t really do anything. I was a derivatives trader, and it occurred to me the world would hardly change at all if credit derivatives ceased to exist. Not so nurse practitioners. What had seemed normal now seemed deeply distorted.

[…]

In the three years since I left, I’ve married, spoken in jails and juvenile detention centers about getting sober, taught a writing class to girls in the foster system, and started a nonprofit called Groceryships to help poor families struggling with obesity and food addiction. I am much happier. I feel as if I’m making a real contribution. And as time passes, the distortion lessens. I see Wall Street’s mantra — “We’re smarter and work harder than everyone else, so we deserve all this money” — for what it is: the rationalization of addicts. From a distance I can see what I couldn’t see then — that Wall Street is a toxic culture that encourages the grandiosity of people who are desperately trying to feel powerful.

For the Love of Money – former “wealth addict” Sam Polk, who ended up at Wall Street after years of drug and alcohol addition, looks back on the tragedy that happens when money and meaning lose common ground. 

Complement with Alan Watts’s timeless question on the subject.

(via explore-blog)

A Short Film with Raf SImons